Think Tank Articles

Planning: The Planning Application Process Explained

Arkhi The Courtyard

The Planning process can be a daunting and problematic task if you aren’t aware of the main steps in the sequence. Use this short guide to help navigate your Planning Application journey.

Do I Need Planning Permission And, What's The Process?

Firstly, it’s imperative to fully understand whether you need to apply for planning consent – some development can be undertaken through Permitted Development Rights under certain parameters. To find out more about PD Rights, read ‘Uncovering your PD Rights: A Householder’s Introduction Guide’.

 

The graphic below gives a useful insight into a simplified process of the planning stage of your project. ​

DO I NEED PLANNING PERMISSION AND, WHAT’S THE PROCESS?

Firstly, it’s imperative to fully understand whether you need to apply for planning consent – some development can be undertaken through Permitted Development Rights under certain parameters. To find out more about PD Rights, read ‘Uncovering your PD Rights: A Householder’s Introduction Guide'.

The graphic below gives a useful insight into a simplified process of the planning stage of your project.

Arkhi The Process

Drawings / Documents Required for Planning

As a base, it is mandatory to submit a Location Plan, Block Plan and Site + any other plans including floorplans and elevations.

 

In addition to the architectural drawings that are a requirement for the application, a series of supporting surveys and/or documentation may be useful to support the application. If these aren’t submitted, the LPA may request these additional surveys. These could include:

·         Topographic Surveys

·         Ecological / Conservation Statements

·         Affordable Housing Statements

·         Structural Surveys

·         Transport Assessments

 

Once the Planning Application has been submitted to the LPA, it will go through a process of validation. The Case Officer associated with the project will check they have all the necessary documents and drawings to move the application on further – this includes the drawings as mentioned above

 

Although there is a standard set of required drawings and documents, each LPA with differ slightly so its best to always double check if you are unsure. Each LPA however will produce a document, in the form of a table or matrix, that accurately lays out what additional information is required for different types of applications. As Arkhi is based in Cheshire East, take a look at their ‘Local Validation Requirements Checklist Matrix’ and their ‘General Planning Application Validation Checklist’ (which includes Drawing Standards combined) as useful examples of what to look for if you’re building in another Local Planning Authority.

Application Management 

At Arkhi, we manage the planning application on your behalf and keep you updated on the progress of the discussions and decision making towards the end of the process. We use our expert knowledge to provide additional details, if requested form the LPA, in support of your application.

Planning Condidtions and the Decision Notice

Once a decision has be made, a decision notice will be published by the Case Officer or LPA. Attached to the Decision Notice, there will usually be a set of conditions attached These conditions must be necessary and relevant to the specific application as well as being enforceable and reasonable – this is set out in paragraphs 56 and 57 of the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF).

 

Depending on the type of conditions, a separate application for the ‘Removal of conditions’ will need to be submitted to the LPA.

Whats Next?

It’s important to remember that Planning Consent is not the only form of legislation you will require to build your scheme. Post-Planning Decision, you will need to adhere to building regulations if your project includes structural alterations. This doesn’t include repair work but new -build dwelling and extensions to existing properties will need to be checked.

 

At this point, we’d also like to draw your attention to Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) and how this can affect your project in financially. Read our short guide for more information. This stage of the process must be submitted and decided upon by the LPA prior to you commencing any work on site.

 

How Can We Help?

At Arkhi, we offer guidance and architectural advice through stages 0-3 of the RIBA which includes feasibility, concept design and planning.

 

If you’d like you know more, take a look at our Arkhi Plan of Work or get in touch for a free initial consultation.

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